Enquiremanchester’s Weblog

The Manchester Museum is the lead museum in the North West Manchester cluster in a national project about art and learning for engage called ‘enquire’

New enquire Publication November 4, 2008

Filed under: Alchemy Enquire,Background,Evaluation — enquiremanchester @ 9:11 am
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The new en-quire publication ‘Inspring Learning in Galleries 02; Excellence and Inclusion’ has just been sent out.  Its a comprehensive overview of the work the engage has supported as part of its enquire strand over the last two years, covering all the participating clusters working in England.

As mentioned before, these clusters work in partnership with schools/youth groups, galleries, artists and higher education professionals to develop the action research. This research programme focuses on how children and young people can learn through galelries, contemporary art and artists.  In Phase 1 of enquire, which The Manchester Museum was not part of, took place in 2004-2006 and invovled three clusters.  For Phase 2 the number of clusters grew to seven and The Manchester Museum became invovled at this stage.  This new report highlights the last two years of work of these seven clusters and some of the things we have learnt as part of this programme – you can read about this in an earlier post

Here is an image of the report, in case you happen accross it in your area of practice and click here to download them from the enquire website.

 

Research reports August 19, 2008

Exploring the museum
Exploring the museum

For each of two years of action research we produced a research report.  These reports are currently being edited and published by enquire as part of the national enquire findings.

As a preview to the published report I just wanted to highlight some of the things that stood out during the research.

The research had an emphasis on collaboration and reflection within a tripartite framework of museum, school and artist. The underlying objective was to evidence how museums, schools and artists could best work together with contemporary art to create benefits for learning.

Year one (working with a researcher from The University of Manchester, Erinma Ochu):  what we learned

  • projects need time to plan, reflect, evaluate and learn from the processes
  • the roles of partners need to be clearly identified from the beginning so people know what they are responsible for and who they can go to
  • teachers, artists and museum educators should learn together from the beginning in the form of a collaborative exploration – its easy to over or underestimate how much each other knows

Year two (working with researchers Liz Jones, Christina Macrae and Rachel Holmes of Manchester Metropolitan’s Education and Social Research Institute:  what we learned

  • the artists’ pedagogical style placed an emphasis on the young people being co-learners
  • artists and curators provided a conduit between the students and the museum, and, in so doing, breached some of the barriers that prevent certain sectors of society from accessing such institutions
  • all the young people who participated regarded accessing the museums and galleries as a positive experience
Exploring Clifton Marina

Exploring Clifton Marina

Other elements which added to the ‘positive experience’ for young people were:

•    opportunities to browse and wander in an environment that was relaxed and not overtly rule- bound;
•    creation of opportunities for the young people to pursue aspects of their personal agenda, and thus give them some empowerment over their own learning;
•    sensitivity on the part of museum staff and the artists, so that the students were not rushed but allowed to take their time when looking and handling objects,
•    provision of diverse experiences that incorporated active participation – and favoured learning in kinaesthetic and tactile modalities.

So now we’re looking forward to another year where we can develop these ideas into more work and look more closely at how we can promote an environment where they can happen.